Beer (& More) In Food

Beer: The Condiment With An Attitude!

Archive for the ‘beer diet’ Category

Local Author Talks To CBS News About Low-Cal Beers

Posted by Bob Skilnik on April 12, 2010

I received an unexpected call from a very pleasant Kristyn Hartman at WBBM Chicago to pontificate about low-calorie/carbohydrate beers while also getting in a plug for “Does My Butt Look Big In This Beer? Nutritional Values Of 2,000 Worldwide Beers” and BEER: A History of Brewing in Chicago” (BRAND SPANKING NEW, $14.99 and signed by me, with orders fulfilled and shipped by Amazon —Seller name:—toddlintown—since I’m getting lazier as the days go bye and busy with my first granddaughter Norah).

Check out the story and then take a look at the video on the right side of the page.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again…There’s enough interests in the viewers/listeners of the Chicagoland area for a regularly scheduled look at beer, the brewing industry and beer info in general. A producer/director at WTTW brought it up once to me after an appearance on Chicago Tonight, but nothing happened. The Chicago Tribune stated emphatically that a poll they took sometime ago indicated that readers wanted updates on wine but not beer.

The funny thing with a statement like this, however, is the response that I receive after local radio, TV or print exposure when I’m asked to discuss any aspect of beer or brewing; in this latest example, the CBS 2 Chicago video stayed in the 1st place (most viewed) position for a little over 32 hours. It was a nice, well-edited and light-hearted two minute look at a product that vastly overwhelms wine in national sales and interests.

I also like wine, but I still can’t get over the media feedback that I’ve received over the last decade that repeatedly “indicates” more viewer/listener/readership in wine versus beer. Is it just me that feels that there’s a media bias against beer? Is beer or brewery industry news assumed to be too unsophisticated to be reported on as a regular feature and instead beer-themed story skimmed off the slush pile of topics to be used as filler when “news” is a little slow?

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Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Plugs, Video Beer Reviews | Leave a Comment »

Ground Breaking Beer Nutritional Book Now Available As Download Too!

Posted by Bob Skilnik on February 21, 2009

Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers

Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers

Gambrinus Media announced today that “Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER?: Nutritional Values Of 2,000 Worldwide Beers” (ISBN-13: 978-0982218204, $10) is now available in book stores and Internet book sites and in downloadable PDF form.

Author Bob Skilnik has compiled an impressive array of beers, including popular imports, with their nutritional values. Frustrated by the bureaucratic pace of the Alcohol Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) to react to consumer demand and implement new changes in alcohol nutrition labeling requirements, Skilnik contacted brewing industry sources for the kind of nutritional information that might one day be found on the containers of all alcoholic beverages. The result of his research has become a paperback reference book and downloadable file that can be used by dieters counting calories or carbohydrates or by beer drinkers who simply want to know the nutritional values of their favorite brews. Currently, this sort of information is only available on light or low-carbohydrate beers.

MORE INFO ON THE PDF VERSION OF “DOES MY BUTT LOOK BIG IN THIS BEER?” FOUND HERE

Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, Books & Beer, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Weight Watchers POINTS | Leave a Comment »

‘Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER?’ Book Details Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers

Posted by Bob Skilnik on February 18, 2009

(PRWEB) February 18, 2009 — Gambrinus Media announced today that “Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER?: Nutritional Values Of 2,000 Worldwide Beers” (ISBN-13: 978-0982218204, $10) is now available in book stores and Internet book sites. Author Bob Skilnik has compiled an impressive array of beers, including popular imports, with their nutritional values. Frustrated by the bureaucratic pace of the Alcohol Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) to react to consumer demand and implement new changes in alcohol nutrition labeling requirements, Skilnik contacted brewing industry sources for the kind of nutritional information that might one day be found on the containers of all alcoholic beverages. The result of his research has become a paperback reference book that can be used by dieters counting calories or carbohydrates or by beer drinkers who simply want to know the nutritional values of their favorite brews. Currently, this sort of information is only available on light or low-carbohydrate beers.

Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER?
Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER?

“Even if the TTB gave the drink trade the O.K. to add nutrition fact labels to their products tomorrow, the agency would still temper their decision with a 3-year lag period before making it mandatory. To prove a point to critics who say that this kind of consumer-friendly information is unnecessary on adult beverages and to quiet down my doctor who said that my 300-pound body needed a thorough downsizing, I began a weight loss program that included the moderate consumption of my favorite beers, using the nutritional information that breweries have provided me,” says the still shrinking Skilnik.

Story Continues

Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Plugs | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Nutritional Values For Bass Ale & Rogue’s Dead Guy

Posted by Bob Skilnik on February 10, 2009

C’mon over to Drink Healthy, Drink Smart for a video look at the nutritional values for Bass Ale and Rogue’s Dead Guy Ale.

Posted in Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Weight Watchers POINTS | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Peroni Nutritional Values And More

Posted by Bob Skilnik on February 4, 2009

Come on over to http://drinkhealthydrinksmart.com/ for new info, including the numbers for Peroni beer.

Posted in Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Weight Watchers POINTS | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Super Bowl Beers With Nutritional Info

Posted by Bob Skilnik on January 27, 2009

Calories are important to me! Anybody got some spare change?

Calories are important to me! Anybody got some spare change?

Well, once a year, the media drags out the old “Let’s lecture on the best (read: Low-calorie) beers to enjoy while watching the Super Bowl.” I thought I’d do a variance of this and give you a number of different beers, along with their calories, carbs and Weight Watchers POINTS.

I thought you might appreciate a bit more info about them and one more list of full-bodied beers with nutritional info too.

MORE HERE

Posted in Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info | Leave a Comment »

BEER Nutrition Book Now Available

Posted by Bob Skilnik on January 22, 2009

Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers

Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers


NOW AT AMAZON

NOW AT BARNES & NOBLE!

 

Does My BUTT Look BIG

In This BEER?

Nutritional Values of
2,000 Worldwide Beers
 

 

— Bob Skilnik —

aka, The Low-Carb Bartender

Pick up a candy bar, a bag of potato chips, or even your kid’s favorite sugar-coated breakfast cereals and you can refer to a Nutrition Facts label that gives you the kind of nutritional information that you, the consumer, deserves to know.

But pick up a bottle of your favorite beer, and unless it’s a low-calorie or low-carbohydrate brew with a federally-required Nutrition Facts label emblazoned on it, you have no idea what, if any, nutritional components are in a regular-brewed stout, porter, bock, wheat beer or even a simple
American-style pilsner beer…

…Until NOW! Whether you’re counting calories, carbs or even Weight Watchers® Points®, here’s the nutritional information that you can’t find anywhere else but in these following pages for
over 2,000 worldwide beers.

 

Moderation, Not Deprivation!

Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, Book Reviews, Books & Beer, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Weight Watchers POINTS | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER? NOW AVAILABLE!

Posted by Bob Skilnik on January 2, 2009

Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers

Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers

NOW AT AMAZON

NOW AT BARNES & NOBLE!

Does My BUTT Look BIG

In This BEER?

Nutritional Values of
2,000 Worldwide Beers
 

 

— Bob Skilnik —

aka, The Low-Carb Bartender

 

Pick up a candy bar, a bag of potato chips, or even your kid’s favorite sugar-coated breakfast cereals and you can refer to a Nutrition Facts label that gives you the kind of nutritional information that you, the consumer, deserves to know.

But pick up a bottle of your favorite beer, and unless it’s a low-calorie or low-carbohydrate brew with a federally-required Nutrition Facts label emblazoned on it, you have no idea what, if any, nutritional components are in a regular-brewed stout, porter, bock, wheat beer or even a simple
American-style pilsner beer…

…Until NOW! Whether you’re counting calories, carbs or even Weight Watchers® Points®, here’s the nutritional information that you can’t find anywhere else but in these following pages for
over 2,000 worldwide beers.

 

Moderation, Not Deprivation!

Preface

Whether brewers, vintners or distillers like it or not, the Alcohol Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), responsible for labeling requirements of alcoholic beverages, is close to making it mandatory for alcoholic beverages to list their nutritional values. Whenever the TTB can finally arrive at some sort of standardized Nutrition Facts label that makes sense (it might take years), they have assured the drink industry that once they settle on an idea of what will be needed on the Nutrition Facts label, they will still give industry members an additional three years to redesign new labels and ease the cost of testing and relabeling by gradually implementing their compliance timeline.

One compelling reason why this will come to fruition is because of the hand of globalism in today’s universal trade and commerce. As the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States notes in their most recent comment in TTB Notice No. 74, “…this proposed rule change would bring TTB requirements into conformity with the provisions of the World Wine Trade Group (WWTG) Agreement on Wine Labelling (sic). As stated by TTB, ‘[these] negotiations proceeded from the view that common labeling requirements would provide industry members with the opportunity to use the same label when shipping product to each of the WWTG member countries. With a global economy and with free travel among consumers, we support TTB’s effort to harmonize its labeling regulations with international requirements. TTB’s proposal would have the beneficial effect of serving the interests of consumers, as well as eliminating a potential barrier to trade between countries.'”

Change is coming and it has the tailwinds of consumer support and NAFTA conformity behind it with a soon-to-be standardized world market of beer, wine and booze labels. Without acceptance by U.S. drink manufacturers, it’s conceivable that the import/export markets of beers, wines and spirits would come to a halt; but be assured, that that will not happen.

So in reality, the global economy is probably more the driving force behind the eventuality of nutritional labeling on beer, wine and booze than any concerns about the wants or needs of consumers.

But why worry about any of this? In the following pages, you’ll find nutritional information now that will help you to enjoy the moderate consumption of worldwide beer whether you’re counting calories, carbohydrates or WEIGHT WATCHERS® POINTS®, perhaps even trying to pack on the pounds, or simply trying to maintain your current weight. You can even use the alcohol by volume (abv) information in this reference guide to settle bar bets; What’s the strongest beer? The weakest? for instance.

Measurement Tolerances

“The Bureau [TTB] has determined that tolerance ranges are required with respect to labeled statements of caloric, carbohydrate, protein, and fat contents for malt beverages. The intent of these tolerances is to provide for normal production and analytical variables while continuing to ensure that the labeling is not misleading to the consumer.

Held, the statement of caloric content on labels for malt beverages will be considered acceptable as long as the caloric content, as determined by ATF [Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms Bureau] analysis, is within the tolerance +5 and -10 calories of the labeled caloric content. For example a label showing 96 calories will be acceptable if ATF analysis of the product shows a caloric content between 86 and 101 calories.

Held further, the statements of carbohydrate and fat contents on labels for malt beverages will be considered acceptable as long as the carbohydrate and fat contents, as determined by ATF analysis, are within a reasonable range below the labeled amount but, in no case, are more than 20% above the labeled amount. For example, a label showing 4.0 grams (within good manufacturing practice limitations) but not more than 4.8 grams.

Held further, the statement of protein content on labels for malt beverages will be considered acceptable as long as the protein content, as determined by ATF analysis, is within a reasonable range above the labeled amount but, in no case, is less than 80% of the labeled amount. For example, a label showing 1.0 gram protein will be acceptable if ATF analysis of the product shows a protein content which is more than 1.0 gram (within good manufacturing practice limitations) but no less than 0.8 gram.”


Book Guidelines

You’ll probably notice disparities between the nutritional information of the same brands of beer, but brewed in different countries. Guinness or Beck’s comes to mind. Some worldwide breweries contract to have their beers brewed in satellite breweries, far from their home offices. The use of more easily available indigenous grains or accommodating known taste preferences of local beer drinkers can influence the use of different mixtures of grains in the mash, differently treated water sources, ever-changing ratios of various types of hops in the kettle, and even yeast strains in the fermentor, which can account for variances in calories, carbohydrates and alcohol levels for the same brand of beers in different countries. Guinness, for instance, is extremely popular in Nigeria, yet the cost of shipping malted barley from Ireland would be prohibitive. As a result, indigenous grains such as sorghum and soybeans can also be added to the grain bill. As noted throughout the book, and reflective of different brewing practices in a host of countries, the nutritional value for Guinness will vary widely. The beer is currently brewed in 51 countries!

Serving size for beer is listed in the book as 12-ounces (with rare exceptions), even if the beer comes in 22-ounce “bombers” or half-liter bottles, as per the TTB and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) suggestions. That serving size (12-ounces) for beer will assuredly be solidified when the TTB makes its final decision on labeling requirements. I have no idea how the TTB will handle high-strength beers such as The Boston Beer Company’s Utopia or Millenium brands, for instance. The brewery recommends a moderate 2-ounce serving size for these high-alcohol brews, but with a beer serving being defined as 12-ounces, this is just one more standardization problem that the TTB will have to deal with.

No sodium, fat, cholesterol or protein values are listed here. There is NO fat nor cholesterol in beer and trace amounts of sodium and protein values in your favorite brew. While TTB mandated alcoholic drink labels will almost assuredly display protein levels in grams and sodium levels in milligrams-all part of a labeling consistency for beer, wine, liquor and liqueurs-these numbers in beer are insignificant in my opinion, especially in light of the government recommendation of no more than two 12-ounce servings of beer for men and one 12-ounce serving of suds for women per day. For instance, the United States Department of Agriculture’s Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for sodium for a 25 old male is 1500 mg. Your average 12-ounce serving of Budweiser contains less than 10 mg of sodium. The average 12-ounce serving of Budweiser also contains 1.3 grams (gm) of protein while the RDA for protein for a male, 25 years and older, is 63 grams. (I used a 25-year old male for obvious reasons; they do enjoy their beers.) You could check out similar parameters for 25-year old women or different ages for men and women and you’d never find any beer, let alone a Budweiser, coming anywhere near RDA levels. You’d have to drink more than 150 bottles of Budweiser to hit the sodium RDA or chug down a little more than 49 bottles of the stuff to hit the protein RDA. Remember again; we’re considering the fed’s recommendation of no more than two 12-ounce servings of beer a day for men and one serving for women. The need to worry about sodium and protein in beer seems like a wasted exercise, so these nutritional values are ignored here. 

One more caveat. Breweries are changing, and tweaking their recipes all the time, skewing their beers’ nutritional values with any given batch. Also be aware that any measurement of the nutritional values of beer is based on an average analysis. No two batches of beer will ever be the same. That’s why the TTB gives an expected range (+, -) for calorie, carbohydrate and protein analyses. Of the many breweries that contributed to this book, The Lion Brewery in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania was the only brewery that sent me their beer nutritional information with expected ranges, not as definitive numbers. That’s really how you have to look at the information in this book; numbers will fluctuate with each batch of beer. Keeping the nutritional data within an expected range and deriving an average analysis of product is what’s given here.

I welcome any documented corrections to the material presented here and will post them on our website and will also include the newest numbers in future printings of this book. There are more than 2,000 beers in this list, the majority of them with ALL their carbs, calories, and alcohol by volume percentages listed. You’ll waste your time going through the various websites with nutritional values of beer. Using info direct from the breweries, I’ve often found that the website nutritional values are wrong; more often than not, very wrong!

This material, as presented, is copyrighted. Slight “ringers” with an insignificant difference of .01 g carbs or 1 calorie have been added to the list to track any attempts to duplicate this material.

We’ll be online soon with ever-expanding information on beer, wine, and booze nutritional values and be presenting plenty of tips on how to enjoy them in a moderate, responsible and healthful manner. 

On the website, you’ll find:

  • New and updated information  for the nutritional values for beer, wine and booze as more numbers come in
  • Lower-calorie, lower-carbohydrate and lower-fat recipe versions of your favorite mixed-drinks
  • Tasty recipes for making your own lower-calorie, lower-carbohydrate and lower-fat liquors, liqueurs and bar mixes
  • Food recipes using beer, wine and booze as condiments, with an emphasis on flavorful and healthy dishes
  • Video presentations of much of what’s listed above
  • A drink recipe exchange forum

Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, Book Reviews, Books & Beer, Booze Drink Recipes, Booze Nutritional Info, Booze Recipes, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Cooking With Beer, Liqueur Nutritional Info, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Spirits Nutritional Info, Video Recipes, Weight Watchers POINTS, Wine And Carbohydrates, Wine Nutritional Info | Tagged: , , , , | 13 Comments »

Nutritional Info For A-B Shock Top

Posted by Bob Skilnik on December 12, 2008

Shock Top by Anheuser-Busch

Shock Top by Anheuser-Busch

 

 

Anheuser-Busch Shock Top          
  
12 oz        14.80 carbs    168 calories       

    5.2% abv     3 Weight Watchers POINTS

 

 

Posted in Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Weight Watchers POINTS | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Nutritional Info For SN Celebration Ale

Posted by Bob Skilnik on December 10, 2008

Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale  
12 oz    19.40 carbs   214 calories   6.8% abv    5 Weight Watchers POINTS  

Celebration Ale, 5 Weight Watchers POINTS

Celebration Ale, 5 Weight Watchers POINTS

Posted in Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Weight Watchers POINTS | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Nutritional Info For Avery Old Jubilation

Posted by Bob Skilnik on December 9, 2008

Old Jubilation    12 oz     21.90 carbs    242 calories  8% abv  Weight Watchers POINTS  4

 

Avery Brewing in Boulder, Colo.                                                    

Old Jubilation

Old Jubilation

Old Jubilation is reddish brown and rich, and at first it seems to be a simple dark beer that’s been flavored with toffee or perhaps pine. But there are no added spices, just a beautiful blend of five different specialty malts blended nicely with English hops.

Posted in Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Advertise In “Does My Butt Look Big In This Beer?” Tell Your Customers You Care

Posted by Bob Skilnik on October 19, 2008

COMING IN DECEMBER, 2008
PLACE A FULL-PAGE AD IN THIS
REVOLUTIONARY BEER REFERENCE BOOK

 

Reference Book Contains the Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers, Complete With Calorie and Carbohydrate Content, Alcohol by Volume and Weight Watchers® Points – Valuable Reference Guide for Anyone on Weight Watchers, Atkins, South Beach or a Lifestyle of Moderation

CHICAGO, IL – October 20, 2008 /PR Web/ — Gambrinus Media announced today that “Does My Butt Look Big In This Beer?” (ISBN Pending, $12.95) will soon be heading to bookstores. Author Bob Skilnik continues his exploration of beer and nutrition, following on the success of his three earlier books, “The Drink Beer, Get Thin Diet: A Low-Carbohydrate Approach,” “The Low Carb Bartender” and “101 Ways to Cut Fat and Carbs.” This 3-pack of books has placed Skilnik on the national scene with appearances on ABC’s “The View,” ESPN’s former morning show, “Cold Pizza” and multiple appearances on the FOX News Channel. His experiences have also shown him that there’s a huge and growing segment of beer drinkers who want expanded nutritional information on the labels of their favorite brews. According to Skilnik, with the coming of his new beer reference book of over 2,000 beers with their nutritional values, they won’t have long to wait.

 

While the Alcohol Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) grapples with the demand for nutritional labeling requirements of alcoholic beverages, “Does My Butt Look Big In This Beer?” will provide the kind of information that beer drinkers want now. The TTB admits that whenever they can come to a labeling compromise that will lessen the financial burden on the brewing industry with new imposed labeling standards and satisfy consumer advocacy groups which have been pushing this approach for decades, it will still take a 3-year lag period before mandates kick in. Actual projections of 4 to 5 years before consumers can finally find this kind of detailed nutritional information on beer labels are expected by consumer groups and the brewing industry. But the author and certified brewer Skilnik says “Why wait?”

 

“With the help of breweries around the world, including a number of popular U.S. microbreweries, “Does My Butt Look Big In This Beer?” will provide solid information on the nutritive values of more than 2,000 worldwide beers. Brewers can further help this effort by contacting us with the necessary production information of their beer portfolios for last minute inclusion. This is not a diet book, but will give customers more information about their favorite beers. Informed customers might pass by a 50-stack display, just because a competitor took the time to contact our office with the information we need for this book. Owners from craft breweries like Abita, Alaskan, Flying Dog, Full Sail, Sierra Nevada, Goose Island, the Minhas/Huber Brewery, and so many more, for instance, have been extremely cooperative with my requests for nutritional information of their fine products, as well as receiving great support from venerable brewing giants such as Anheuser-Busch, Foster’s, Grolsch, Heineken, Lion-Nathan and many more. These companies thrive in today’s competitive beer market because they understand what their customers want. I see this demonstrated all the time in e-mails that I receive about my earlier books, works that only touched on carbohydrates in beer. Beer drinkers want access to full nutritional info of their favorite products and have turned to me for help. Regretfully, federal foot-dragging and head-in-the-sand resistance by some brewers who seem to ignore what their customers are looking for on beer labels has made this a struggle. Fortunately, persistence and the open-armed help of so many other progressive brewers who realize that this is the kind of information that their customers want, has made this book possible. I’m extremely grateful to these breweries, big, small and U.S. or foreign-owned, for their help.”

 

Skilnik hopes that breweries throughout the world will continue to contact him with information on their products for last minute inclusion in this revolutionary reference book before it goes to print in late November.

 

A certain number of pages will also be held open for sponsorship opportunities, including full-page black & white ads. Sponsorship fees and other questions about the book can be found by going to www. BeerandMoreinFood.Wordpress.com. A separate 2.0 website with videos, podcasts and updates to the book are in development. Its launch will coincide with the release of “Does My Butt Look Big In This Beer?”

 

Bob Skilnik is a certified brewer, author, freelance writer and lecturer. He is a contributor newspapers and magazines, including the Chicago Tribune’s “Good Eating” section and Draft Magazine, and a former columnist for the LowCarb Magazine, writing under the alias of “The Low-Carb Bartender.” He was recently interviewed by Forbes.com as part of a series of national food and drink luminaries on beer enjoyment that included Skilnik, the Food Network’s Mario Batali, bad boy chef and television personality Anthony Bourdain, and Chef Jamie Oliver. 
**************
  

Release date: December, 2008
Paperback book, available with perfect binding.
120 pages.   7.5″ x 9.25″  (235mm  x  191mm)
20% premium for first page insert ad.  15% premium for last page insert ad.
Distribution is with Ingram, the largest distributor of books in the world, with access to brick-and-mortar and online stores throughout the world, including Amazon and Barnes & Noble and score more.
Contact Bob Skilnik at 815.557.4608 for more details.

***************

Recent Mentions and Reviews For Bob Skilnik’s Books                  

Beer & Food: An American History

“A tasty history, from beer soup to Beer Nuts, with pickled pigs’ feet in between.”
Philadelphia Daily News

“His book gives a fascinating account of the birth and growth of our country’s brewing industry and its influence on American cuisine.”
CantonRep.com

Beer: A History of Brewing in Chicago

“Bob Skilnik thinks most historians have overlooked what a thirsty job it was being hog butcher to the world.”
Chicago Tribune

“…the real Chicago story began with Prohibition, and this is where local author Skilnik shines.” Chicago Sun-Times

“Skilnik’s book, quite skillfully, brings focus to the history of Chicago’s beer production, distribution, retail sale, and consumption patterns.”
Illinois Heritage Magazine

The Drink Beer, Get Thin Diet: A Low-Carbohydrate Approach

“It may not be for everyone, but beer lovers will certainly applaud his effort.”
The Chicago Tribune

“Bob Skilnik’s diet book could be an entertaining stocking stuffer for the beer drinker on your list who needs to lose a few pounds.”
The Atlantic Journal-Constitution

“Skilnik makes a take-notice promise in his preface: “With careful monitoring of your daily carbohydrate intake, you’ll be able to enjoy two or more beers a day and still lose weight.”  The Detroit Free Press

“With a sense of humor and self-deprecating observations about his own diet struggles, Skilnik argues that the average beer drinker loads up on too many other high-carb foods.”
Philadelphia Daily News

“Nothing has kept the weight off until [Skilnik] developed this plan.”
Contra Costa Times

“The book amounts to a low-carb diet plan, similar to many on the market, except that this one allows beer.”
Lexington Herald-Leader

“Skilnik’s credentials for writing such a book are his…experiences trying nearly every diet out there in the past 30 years.”
Contra Costa Times

“Beer expert Bob Skilnik’s new diet book, The Drink Beer, Get Thin Diet, shows how to regulate carbohydrates without giving up good beer.”
Modern Brewery Age.  

Skilnik has also appeared on a number of television and radio stations in the U.S. and Canada promoting his books. A small sampling follows:

Television

ABC
The View
New York City, NY

ESPN2
Cold Pizza
New York City, NY

Fox News Channel
New York City, NY

Fox News Channel
Chicago, IL

WTTW/PBS
Chicago Tonight
Chicago, IL

Radio

WGN Radio 720 AM
Extension 720 with Milt Rosenberg
Chicago, IL

WGN Radio 720 AM
The Kathy & Judy Show
Chicago, IL

The Rock, 95.1
Rock Mornings With Chris & April
Chatham, Ontario, Canada

CHQR 770 AM
Calgary, Alberta, Canada

KURR 99.5
Clear Channel (Simulcast)
Salt Lake City, UT-Colorado Springs, CO-Reno, NV

SD TALK RADIO
The Gourmet Club, Listen-On-Demand
San Diego, CA

 

Posted in Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, Books & Beer, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Plugs, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , | 4 Comments »

The Beer Drinker’s Guide to Weightlifting

Posted by Bob Skilnik on January 22, 2008

extreme_muscle_man.jpg

Coming Soon!

Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER?

Aside from the <ahem>, “literary style” that this fellow blogger offers (self-described as “…a single, sexually deprived guy who spends way too much time at the corner bar”), maybe there’s a tid-bit or two of information for you beer-drinking weight lifters in his entry at The Gravitation to the Corner Bar.

“Ok, so you want to start lifting weights. You may not want to get huge, you may just want to get in shape, but the bottom line is you want results. Wait, what’s that? You think you have to give up beer in order to get in shape? You think you have to give up partying and watch the big game at home instead of at the bar with your friends? Nonsense! Are you crazy?

I’m going to let you in on a little secret here… ”

And this little nugget: “This is The Beer Drinker’s Guide to Weightlifting, not The Weightlifting Guide for Beer Drinkers. Beer comes first.”

I like a guy who has his priorities straight.

Posted in beer diet, Drink In General | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Nutritional Info For More Goose Island Products

Posted by Bob Skilnik on January 6, 2008

beerdietpyramidgood.gif  Honker’s Ale  
  12 oz   16.50 g carbs   154 calories   4.5% abv

  India Pale Ale  
  12 oz   21.50 g carbs   206 calories   5.9% abv

  MORE INFO HERE

Posted in Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Nutritional Info For Bitburger Pils

Posted by Bob Skilnik on October 8, 2007

bitburgerpilsbottle.jpgBitburger  Pils                  12 oz   9.05 g carbs                 146 calories     4.8% abv

Posted in Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer | 1 Comment »

Drink Beer To Increase Muscle Tone?

Posted by Bob Skilnik on August 4, 2007


Post moved here

http://drinkhealthydrinksmart.com/?p=761

Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER?

— Bob Skilnik —

aka, The Low-Carb Bartender

Pick up a candy bar, a bag of potato chips, or even your kid’s favorite sugar-coated breakfast cereal and you can refer to a Nutrition Facts label that gives you the kind of nutritional information that you, the consumer, deserves to know.
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But pick up a bottle of your favorite beer, and unless it’s a low-calorie or low-carbohydrate brew with a federally-required Nutrition Facts label emblazoned on it, you have no idea what, if any, nutritional components are in your favorite stout, porter, bock, wheat beer or even a simple American-style pilsner beer.

But no longer. Whether you’re counting calories, carbs or even Weight Watchers® Points®, here’s the nutritional information for over 1,500 worldwide beers that you can enjoy in moderation!

Moderation, not deprivation


Posted in Beer & Food In The News, beer diet, Neo-Prohibition | Tagged: , , , , , , | 3 Comments »