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Posts Tagged ‘Skilnik’

Brewer Petitions President Obama for ‘Beer Nutrition Czar’ Position

Posted by Bob Skilnik on June 15, 2009

With Obama Administration About to Appoint as Many Czars as a 30-Pack of Warm Beer, Chicago Author and Certified Brewer Will Petition Country’s Chief Beer Drinker (CBD) for a Much Needed Beer Nutrition Czar Slot

Chicago, IL (PRWEB) June 15, 2009 — Publisher Bob Skilnik, president of Gambrinus Media, announced his candidacy today for the role of United States “Beer Nutrition Czar.” President Obama might soon be looking for another Czar who can help clarify the innumerable misconceptions about beer’s historic role as a beverage of moderation, hopes Skilnik (although he has little faith that the President won’t be able to resist saying “more taxes” and “beer” in the same sentence).

After personally fending off dozens of Internet critics, nutritionists, dieticians, and in one dramatic case, the incorrect information represented in the early version of “The South Beach Diet” that demonized all beers as beer belly makers (later retracted by the book’s author) with the 2003 and 2004 publications of his “Drink Beer, Get Thin Diet” and “The Low-Carb Bartender,” Skilnik thinks it’s high time that the President appoints him as national “Beer Nutrition Czar” and allow him to spread the word of beer’s nutritional benefits.

 Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER? Nutritional Values Of 2,000 Worldwide Beers

The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans cite several studies indicating that light-to-moderate alcohol consumption is linked to lower mortality from coronary heart disease, especially among men ages 45 or older and women ages 55 or older. But because of the bureaucratic suppression of such information, Skilnik has felt compelled to write “Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER? Nutritional Values Of 2,000 Worldwide Beers” (ISBN-13: 978-0982218204, $10), now available in book stores and Internet book sites. Tired of waiting for the federal alcohol regulatory agency, the Alcohol Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) to implement new changes in proposed alcohol nutrition labeling requirements that would tell consumers the nutritional benefits of beer, author and brewer Skilnik has instead compiled an impressive array of brews with their nutritional values. The paperback book can be used by dieters counting calories or carbohydrates or by moderate beer drinkers who simply want to know the nutritional values of what he or she is drinking. Following the book’s lead, Skilnik has shed 80 pounds with a smile on his face and a beer in his hand. Currently, this kind of information is only available on light or low-carbohydrate beers, another Washingtonian mistake.

“Look, I understand that one more Czar in Washington would only add to the notion that there could be more Czars in D.C. than you might have found at a turn-of-a-century Romanoff wedding. I’d therefore be willing instead to be a ‘Roving Beer Nutrition Czar,’ visiting bar after bar – something my wife would attest that I’m already quite adroit at – to get the word out on the positive attributes of America’s favorite adult beverage. I’m tired of reading websites of half-truths or picking up popular diet books that meekly admit that a little beer is good for your heart but then can’t tell you how many calories, carbohydrates or even Weight Watchers POINTS® are in beer or read the further mindless dribble of web-based ‘experts’ who claim that beer contains nothing more than ’empty’ calories. In reality, you can find fat soluble vitamins such as A, D, E, K and water soluble vitamins like C, B1, B2, B6, B12, folic acid, biotin and niacin in beer. In addition, beer also contains more than 20 minerals, some protein, no fat, no cholesterol and less sodium per serving than all the honest politicians in all the bars in D.C. on a Friday night.”

“This Friday, June 19, 2009, I will be sending my resume to the White House in consideration for this much-needed political appointment. At the rate that President Obama is appointing Czars, I figure if I jump into the barrel early enough, I might have a strong chance of securing this spot. My son’s high school jeweled Prom King crown fits me, so that should help keep the federal budget somewhat in line with the kind of ceremonial accouterments needed for this important post, and if we concentrate on American beers only, we’ll be able to keep jobs from going overseas and make America stronger. Last week, I personally kept a U.S. brewing crew and three Chicago bartenders in business, and if I might add, without any T.A.R. P. funds.”

Bob Skilnik is a certified brewer and freelance writer. He has been a contributor to the Good Eating Section of the Chicago Tribune and a former columnist for the LowCarb Energy magazine. The Chicago writer has appeared on ABC’s “The View,” ESPN2’s “Cold Pizza,” and Fox News Channel’s “Fox News Live,” preaching the moderate consumption and nutritional aspects of adult beverages. Skilnik is currently working on a similar nutritional research project with wine for fall publication.

“Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER? Nutritional Values Of 2,000 Worldwide Beers” is distributed by Ingram Book Group, the world’s largest wholesale distributor of book products and available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. With four distribution centers strategically located throughout the country and the largest inventory in the industry, Ingram provides the fastest delivery available.

More info on Skilnik’s efforts to de-fang nutritional misnomers about adult beverages can be found at http://MyBeerButt.com.

All trademarks and service marks are the property of the respective parties.

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Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, Weight Watchers POINTS | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Diabetics Given New Hope with Book Offering Thousands of Beer Choices That Reveal Their Calories, Carbs and Alcohol Content

Posted by Bob Skilnik on April 8, 2009

While Diabetes Associations Suggest Switching to Drinks That Are Lower in Alcohol and Sugar, Current Labeling Laws Fail to Provide Needed Information

 

 Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER? Nutritional Values Of 2,000 Worldwide Beers

Chicago, Ill. (PRWEB) April 8, 2009 — Gambrinus Media announced today that “Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER? Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers” (ISBN-13: 978-0982218204, $10) is now available in book stores and Internet book sites. The valuable information provided in the paperback book can be used by diabetics under the supervision of their physicians, dieters counting calories or carbohydrates or beer drinkers who simply want to know the nutritional values of what they are drinking. Currently, this kind of information is only available on the federally-mandated nutrition facts labels of light or low-carbohydrate beers.

Tired of waiting for the Alcohol Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) to implement transparency in alcohol nutrition labeling requirements, author Bob Skilnik has compiled an impressive array of beers, including popular imports and crafts, with their nutritional values.

“At the moment, individual states determine whether or not the alcoholic strength of a beer can be displayed on containers or advertising materials. If you’re looking for carbohydrate or calorie content on your favorite beers, forget it. You won’t find it, no matter what state you’re in. Suggestions by leading diabetes organizations to seek out beers with less alcohol and carbohydrates are meaningless if that information is not made readily available to consumers.”

A few years ago, the TTB, the federal agency that controls labeling requirements for alcoholic beverages, opened up a comment campaign for a possible new labeling design that drew over 18,000 comments concerning the proposed addition of a nutrition facts label on all alcoholic beverages, similar to what’s found on most packaged foodstuffs. About 96 percent of the comments received by the agency demonstrated a strong wanting for nutritional labeling on all alcoholic products.

“The brewing industry is currently rushing gluten-free beers to store shelves for those beer drinkers who rank among the 2 million Americans who suffer from Celiac Disease, a condition that can damage the intestines due to intolerance to gluten, a protein found in various grains such as barley. Other breweries are trying to capture the even smaller niche of those drinkers looking for ‘organic’ beers. In the meantime, almost 24 million Americans suffer from diabetes, a huge demographic in an otherwise flat market that finally has the opportunity to enjoy a beer or two with a meal or snack, empowered by the information provided in ‘Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER? Nutritional Values Of 2,000 Worldwide Beers’ while under the supervision of their physician, dietician or nutritionist.”

Bob Skilnik is a certified brewer and freelance writer. He’s been a contributor to the Good Eating Section of the Chicago Tribune and a former columnist for the LowCarb Energy magazine. The Chicago writer has appeared on ABC’s “The View,” ESPN2’s “Cold Pizza,” Fox News Channel’s “Fox News Live,” and Chicagoland print, radio and television outlets, preaching the moderate consumption and nutritional aspects of adult beverages. Skilnik is currently working on a similar nutritional research project with wine for late summer publication. More information can be found at “Drink Healthy, Drink Smart” (http://drinkhealthydrinksmart.com)

“Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER? Nutritional Values Of 2,000 Worldwide Beers” is distributed by Ingram Book Group, the world’s largest wholesale distributor of book products. With four distribution centers strategically located throughout the country and the largest inventory in the industry, Ingram provides the fastest delivery available.

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Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, Beer Nutritional Info, Book Reviews, Books & Beer, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Plugs | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

When King Richard and His Media Flunkies Helped Bury Old Style in Chicago

Posted by Bob Skilnik on March 26, 2009

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer History | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

‘Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER?’ Book Details Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers

Posted by Bob Skilnik on February 18, 2009

(PRWEB) February 18, 2009 — Gambrinus Media announced today that “Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER?: Nutritional Values Of 2,000 Worldwide Beers” (ISBN-13: 978-0982218204, $10) is now available in book stores and Internet book sites. Author Bob Skilnik has compiled an impressive array of beers, including popular imports, with their nutritional values. Frustrated by the bureaucratic pace of the Alcohol Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) to react to consumer demand and implement new changes in alcohol nutrition labeling requirements, Skilnik contacted brewing industry sources for the kind of nutritional information that might one day be found on the containers of all alcoholic beverages. The result of his research has become a paperback reference book that can be used by dieters counting calories or carbohydrates or by beer drinkers who simply want to know the nutritional values of their favorite brews. Currently, this sort of information is only available on light or low-carbohydrate beers.

Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER?
Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER?

“Even if the TTB gave the drink trade the O.K. to add nutrition fact labels to their products tomorrow, the agency would still temper their decision with a 3-year lag period before making it mandatory. To prove a point to critics who say that this kind of consumer-friendly information is unnecessary on adult beverages and to quiet down my doctor who said that my 300-pound body needed a thorough downsizing, I began a weight loss program that included the moderate consumption of my favorite beers, using the nutritional information that breweries have provided me,” says the still shrinking Skilnik.

Story Continues

Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Plugs | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

5 Valentine Day Beers With Nutritional Info

Posted by Bob Skilnik on February 12, 2009

OK. I admit that this post is a bit of a stretch, but I was trying to find beers that might appeal to women — as well as men, while still keeping an eye on the nutritional data of these beers. Sometimes, however, just like with love, you have to just jump in and say the hell with it! I think this selection will work. Remember; there are no bad beers, just bad beer drinkers.

5 Valentine Day Beers With Nutritional Info

Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, Beer Nutritional Info, Books & Beer, carbohydrates in beer, Weight Watchers POINTS | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Nutritional Values For Bass Ale & Rogue’s Dead Guy

Posted by Bob Skilnik on February 10, 2009

C’mon over to Drink Healthy, Drink Smart for a video look at the nutritional values for Bass Ale and Rogue’s Dead Guy Ale.

Posted in Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Weight Watchers POINTS | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Peroni Nutritional Values And More

Posted by Bob Skilnik on February 4, 2009

Come on over to http://drinkhealthydrinksmart.com/ for new info, including the numbers for Peroni beer.

Posted in Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Weight Watchers POINTS | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

BEER Nutrition Book Now Available

Posted by Bob Skilnik on January 22, 2009

Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers

Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers


NOW AT AMAZON

NOW AT BARNES & NOBLE!

 

Does My BUTT Look BIG

In This BEER?

Nutritional Values of
2,000 Worldwide Beers
 

 

— Bob Skilnik —

aka, The Low-Carb Bartender

Pick up a candy bar, a bag of potato chips, or even your kid’s favorite sugar-coated breakfast cereals and you can refer to a Nutrition Facts label that gives you the kind of nutritional information that you, the consumer, deserves to know.

But pick up a bottle of your favorite beer, and unless it’s a low-calorie or low-carbohydrate brew with a federally-required Nutrition Facts label emblazoned on it, you have no idea what, if any, nutritional components are in a regular-brewed stout, porter, bock, wheat beer or even a simple
American-style pilsner beer…

…Until NOW! Whether you’re counting calories, carbs or even Weight Watchers® Points®, here’s the nutritional information that you can’t find anywhere else but in these following pages for
over 2,000 worldwide beers.

 

Moderation, Not Deprivation!

Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, Book Reviews, Books & Beer, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Weight Watchers POINTS | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Old Style, Part II- Doing It On The Cheap

Posted by Bob Skilnik on January 21, 2009

This ressurection of the Old Style brand is actually a second (maybe third) attempt to reinvigorate the brand. 
Old Style Retro Ad

Old Style Retro Ad

 
I received a telephone call a few years ago, asking if I could put together 2 focus groups – one of former Old Style drinkers/one of current OS drinkers. The ad agency that hired me was from San Francisco so it seemed doomed from the beginning, with a West Coast agency running this, unfamiliar with the Chicago beer drinker. I had just written Volume II of my Chicago beer book and had done an extensive detailing of the rise and fall of the brand in the Chicagoland area. This was probably in 2002 since the brand was celebrating its 100th birthday.
 
We assembled in a small North Side neighborhood bar with Chicago Pabst distributors and the West Coast ad men, with about 40 beer drinkers. Everyone gave testimony as to why or why they didn’t drink the beer from “God’s Country.” The next day, I was filmed while I received the 3rd degree from the ad men and the distributors about the rise and fall of the brand. The problem, as everyone saw it, was that the biggest OS-drinking bar was Wrigley Field and once everyone walked out on a Cub’s game, they went back to drinking their “regular” beer.  Why?
 
Well, we had a lot of good ideas, but when someone mentioned the word “money,” you could see the eyes of the distributors roll back into their heads – a Pabst philosophy…do it on the cheap.
 
Some ideas we had were
 
* Neighborhood 16-inch softball sponsorships, followed by any other sport since A-B had the pro game events locked up. The distributors were whipped on this, claiming that they didn’t have a chance since A-B and Miller had Chicago sports covered, even at the neighborhood level. The only money spent on Chicago sports was/is for the Cubs, although in actuality, Budweiser is really the #1 sponsor (The Official Sponsor) of the Cubs; Old Style is just a sponsor, although they make a lot of noise about their sponsorship while A-B doesn’t have to.
* Return to kraeusening of the beer.
* Start brewing the beer back at City Brewery in LaCrosse since it seemed so odd to see the beer being brewed in Milwaukee.
* Going back to retro advertsising.
* Just advertise, period. The entire ad budget seemed to be wrapped around the Cubs.
 
For awhile, they did return the brewing to LaCrosse but never made a big deal about it and it quietly went back to Milwaukee to be brewed. Kraeusening the beer and making a bit of a media fuss about it seems to be their second chance in reawakening the beer brand and getting some press about it. It’s going to be difficult, it not down right impossible, to raise the price from its “popular-priced” category (read: cheap) to a sub-premium price. They’re going to have to do more to convince the customer of higher attributes in the beer than just adding some new beer with active yeasts into the fermented batch. Sure, it “scrubs” the beer somewhat and drags out some of the off taste and greenishness of the beer, but so what?
And that brings us back to what 40 former and current Old Style beer drinkers told the San Francisco ad men and the Chicagoland Pabst distributors;
Spend more money on the brand. Advertise in print, on the radio, even local TV. Sponsor local neighborhood sports events. Start making noise about the brand, its history, how important it once was in Chicago. Don’t say it’s “Chicago’s beer”; Make it Chicago’s Beer.
Oh, and did I mention? Spend more money on the brand!
 
Here’s a link to an article that was written about all of this. I can’t pull it up as a good link, just in the cache, so some words are color-indexed.
A much more extensive story about Old Style in Chicago can be read in BEER: A History of Brewing in Chicago.
A History of Brewing in Chicago

BEER: A History of Brewing in Chicago

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Does My BUTT Look BIG In This BEER? NOW AVAILABLE!

Posted by Bob Skilnik on January 2, 2009

Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers

Nutritional Values of 2,000 Worldwide Beers

NOW AT AMAZON

NOW AT BARNES & NOBLE!

Does My BUTT Look BIG

In This BEER?

Nutritional Values of
2,000 Worldwide Beers
 

 

— Bob Skilnik —

aka, The Low-Carb Bartender

 

Pick up a candy bar, a bag of potato chips, or even your kid’s favorite sugar-coated breakfast cereals and you can refer to a Nutrition Facts label that gives you the kind of nutritional information that you, the consumer, deserves to know.

But pick up a bottle of your favorite beer, and unless it’s a low-calorie or low-carbohydrate brew with a federally-required Nutrition Facts label emblazoned on it, you have no idea what, if any, nutritional components are in a regular-brewed stout, porter, bock, wheat beer or even a simple
American-style pilsner beer…

…Until NOW! Whether you’re counting calories, carbs or even Weight Watchers® Points®, here’s the nutritional information that you can’t find anywhere else but in these following pages for
over 2,000 worldwide beers.

 

Moderation, Not Deprivation!

Preface

Whether brewers, vintners or distillers like it or not, the Alcohol Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), responsible for labeling requirements of alcoholic beverages, is close to making it mandatory for alcoholic beverages to list their nutritional values. Whenever the TTB can finally arrive at some sort of standardized Nutrition Facts label that makes sense (it might take years), they have assured the drink industry that once they settle on an idea of what will be needed on the Nutrition Facts label, they will still give industry members an additional three years to redesign new labels and ease the cost of testing and relabeling by gradually implementing their compliance timeline.

One compelling reason why this will come to fruition is because of the hand of globalism in today’s universal trade and commerce. As the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States notes in their most recent comment in TTB Notice No. 74, “…this proposed rule change would bring TTB requirements into conformity with the provisions of the World Wine Trade Group (WWTG) Agreement on Wine Labelling (sic). As stated by TTB, ‘[these] negotiations proceeded from the view that common labeling requirements would provide industry members with the opportunity to use the same label when shipping product to each of the WWTG member countries. With a global economy and with free travel among consumers, we support TTB’s effort to harmonize its labeling regulations with international requirements. TTB’s proposal would have the beneficial effect of serving the interests of consumers, as well as eliminating a potential barrier to trade between countries.'”

Change is coming and it has the tailwinds of consumer support and NAFTA conformity behind it with a soon-to-be standardized world market of beer, wine and booze labels. Without acceptance by U.S. drink manufacturers, it’s conceivable that the import/export markets of beers, wines and spirits would come to a halt; but be assured, that that will not happen.

So in reality, the global economy is probably more the driving force behind the eventuality of nutritional labeling on beer, wine and booze than any concerns about the wants or needs of consumers.

But why worry about any of this? In the following pages, you’ll find nutritional information now that will help you to enjoy the moderate consumption of worldwide beer whether you’re counting calories, carbohydrates or WEIGHT WATCHERS® POINTS®, perhaps even trying to pack on the pounds, or simply trying to maintain your current weight. You can even use the alcohol by volume (abv) information in this reference guide to settle bar bets; What’s the strongest beer? The weakest? for instance.

Measurement Tolerances

“The Bureau [TTB] has determined that tolerance ranges are required with respect to labeled statements of caloric, carbohydrate, protein, and fat contents for malt beverages. The intent of these tolerances is to provide for normal production and analytical variables while continuing to ensure that the labeling is not misleading to the consumer.

Held, the statement of caloric content on labels for malt beverages will be considered acceptable as long as the caloric content, as determined by ATF [Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms Bureau] analysis, is within the tolerance +5 and -10 calories of the labeled caloric content. For example a label showing 96 calories will be acceptable if ATF analysis of the product shows a caloric content between 86 and 101 calories.

Held further, the statements of carbohydrate and fat contents on labels for malt beverages will be considered acceptable as long as the carbohydrate and fat contents, as determined by ATF analysis, are within a reasonable range below the labeled amount but, in no case, are more than 20% above the labeled amount. For example, a label showing 4.0 grams (within good manufacturing practice limitations) but not more than 4.8 grams.

Held further, the statement of protein content on labels for malt beverages will be considered acceptable as long as the protein content, as determined by ATF analysis, is within a reasonable range above the labeled amount but, in no case, is less than 80% of the labeled amount. For example, a label showing 1.0 gram protein will be acceptable if ATF analysis of the product shows a protein content which is more than 1.0 gram (within good manufacturing practice limitations) but no less than 0.8 gram.”


Book Guidelines

You’ll probably notice disparities between the nutritional information of the same brands of beer, but brewed in different countries. Guinness or Beck’s comes to mind. Some worldwide breweries contract to have their beers brewed in satellite breweries, far from their home offices. The use of more easily available indigenous grains or accommodating known taste preferences of local beer drinkers can influence the use of different mixtures of grains in the mash, differently treated water sources, ever-changing ratios of various types of hops in the kettle, and even yeast strains in the fermentor, which can account for variances in calories, carbohydrates and alcohol levels for the same brand of beers in different countries. Guinness, for instance, is extremely popular in Nigeria, yet the cost of shipping malted barley from Ireland would be prohibitive. As a result, indigenous grains such as sorghum and soybeans can also be added to the grain bill. As noted throughout the book, and reflective of different brewing practices in a host of countries, the nutritional value for Guinness will vary widely. The beer is currently brewed in 51 countries!

Serving size for beer is listed in the book as 12-ounces (with rare exceptions), even if the beer comes in 22-ounce “bombers” or half-liter bottles, as per the TTB and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) suggestions. That serving size (12-ounces) for beer will assuredly be solidified when the TTB makes its final decision on labeling requirements. I have no idea how the TTB will handle high-strength beers such as The Boston Beer Company’s Utopia or Millenium brands, for instance. The brewery recommends a moderate 2-ounce serving size for these high-alcohol brews, but with a beer serving being defined as 12-ounces, this is just one more standardization problem that the TTB will have to deal with.

No sodium, fat, cholesterol or protein values are listed here. There is NO fat nor cholesterol in beer and trace amounts of sodium and protein values in your favorite brew. While TTB mandated alcoholic drink labels will almost assuredly display protein levels in grams and sodium levels in milligrams-all part of a labeling consistency for beer, wine, liquor and liqueurs-these numbers in beer are insignificant in my opinion, especially in light of the government recommendation of no more than two 12-ounce servings of beer for men and one 12-ounce serving of suds for women per day. For instance, the United States Department of Agriculture’s Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for sodium for a 25 old male is 1500 mg. Your average 12-ounce serving of Budweiser contains less than 10 mg of sodium. The average 12-ounce serving of Budweiser also contains 1.3 grams (gm) of protein while the RDA for protein for a male, 25 years and older, is 63 grams. (I used a 25-year old male for obvious reasons; they do enjoy their beers.) You could check out similar parameters for 25-year old women or different ages for men and women and you’d never find any beer, let alone a Budweiser, coming anywhere near RDA levels. You’d have to drink more than 150 bottles of Budweiser to hit the sodium RDA or chug down a little more than 49 bottles of the stuff to hit the protein RDA. Remember again; we’re considering the fed’s recommendation of no more than two 12-ounce servings of beer a day for men and one serving for women. The need to worry about sodium and protein in beer seems like a wasted exercise, so these nutritional values are ignored here. 

One more caveat. Breweries are changing, and tweaking their recipes all the time, skewing their beers’ nutritional values with any given batch. Also be aware that any measurement of the nutritional values of beer is based on an average analysis. No two batches of beer will ever be the same. That’s why the TTB gives an expected range (+, -) for calorie, carbohydrate and protein analyses. Of the many breweries that contributed to this book, The Lion Brewery in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania was the only brewery that sent me their beer nutritional information with expected ranges, not as definitive numbers. That’s really how you have to look at the information in this book; numbers will fluctuate with each batch of beer. Keeping the nutritional data within an expected range and deriving an average analysis of product is what’s given here.

I welcome any documented corrections to the material presented here and will post them on our website and will also include the newest numbers in future printings of this book. There are more than 2,000 beers in this list, the majority of them with ALL their carbs, calories, and alcohol by volume percentages listed. You’ll waste your time going through the various websites with nutritional values of beer. Using info direct from the breweries, I’ve often found that the website nutritional values are wrong; more often than not, very wrong!

This material, as presented, is copyrighted. Slight “ringers” with an insignificant difference of .01 g carbs or 1 calorie have been added to the list to track any attempts to duplicate this material.

We’ll be online soon with ever-expanding information on beer, wine, and booze nutritional values and be presenting plenty of tips on how to enjoy them in a moderate, responsible and healthful manner. 

On the website, you’ll find:

  • New and updated information  for the nutritional values for beer, wine and booze as more numbers come in
  • Lower-calorie, lower-carbohydrate and lower-fat recipe versions of your favorite mixed-drinks
  • Tasty recipes for making your own lower-calorie, lower-carbohydrate and lower-fat liquors, liqueurs and bar mixes
  • Food recipes using beer, wine and booze as condiments, with an emphasis on flavorful and healthy dishes
  • Video presentations of much of what’s listed above
  • A drink recipe exchange forum

Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, Book Reviews, Books & Beer, Booze Drink Recipes, Booze Nutritional Info, Booze Recipes, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Cooking With Beer, Liqueur Nutritional Info, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Spirits Nutritional Info, Video Recipes, Weight Watchers POINTS, Wine And Carbohydrates, Wine Nutritional Info | Tagged: , , , , | 13 Comments »

A Beer Book For ALL Seasons!

Posted by Bob Skilnik on December 16, 2008

Greetings Beer Lover!                                                         

Order by December 17th for Christmas delivery!

Order by December 17th for Christmas delivery!

 
The holidays are coming and it’s time for our favorite beers of the season: Christmas Beer & Winter Warmers.
 
I have two great bits of news for you:

 

“Christmas Beer: The Tastiest, The Cheeriest, Tastiest, and Most Unusual Holiday Brews” is here. It’s the first-ever book devoted to these seasonal favorites. Find it at a bookstore near you, or order your copy through JoeSixpack.net.

The first Philadelphia Christmas Beer Festival is coming Dec. 27th. Held at the beautiful Penn Museum, it’s your chance to enjoy more than 50 of these great seasonal beers.

Posted in Books & Beer, Plugs | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Nutritional Info For A-B Shock Top

Posted by Bob Skilnik on December 12, 2008

Shock Top by Anheuser-Busch

Shock Top by Anheuser-Busch

 

 

Anheuser-Busch Shock Top          
  
12 oz        14.80 carbs    168 calories       

    5.2% abv     3 Weight Watchers POINTS

 

 

Posted in Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Weight Watchers POINTS | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Muntons Malted Ingredients Opens Office In U.S.

Posted by Bob Skilnik on December 11, 2008

Around the mid-1990s, I put away my trusty stainless steel brew pot. Chicago had become a market that almost every known brewery was fighting over, shelves and coolers crammed with s-o-o many national and worldwide beers. Walking into Binny's or Sam's became, for me, the adult version of a kid in a candy store. It became so much easier to buy a sixer of styles I had been recreating in my basement than grinding malt, mashing, sparging, making sure my yeast strter was ready, etc. Being prideful of my ability to spot trends in brewing, including homebrewing, I pronounced homebrewing as dead or a least on life-support.

How many calories? How many carbs?
How many calories? How many carbs?

Boy was I wrong! The hobby is bigger than ever and even I am looking at starting my basement brewing career all over again, this time spending big bucks and buying, in essence, a complete stainless everything pilot brewery. Even Muntons has decided that the malt market is growing more than ever, including not only for homebrewing and the craft beer industry, but even as an additive in the food market. As a result, they've decided to open their first office in the U.S. to further develop their market here. The company has distributors who stock and distribute locally in the US into various market sectors, with sales based in Seattle, Washington and are even holding thoughts of starting a production facility here too at a later date.

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Nutritional Info For SN Celebration Ale

Posted by Bob Skilnik on December 10, 2008

Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale  
12 oz    19.40 carbs   214 calories   6.8% abv    5 Weight Watchers POINTS  

Celebration Ale, 5 Weight Watchers POINTS

Celebration Ale, 5 Weight Watchers POINTS

Posted in Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Weight Watchers POINTS | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Exporters and watchdogs question US booze labelling

Posted by Bob Skilnik on December 10, 2008

Here’s one more reason why the nutritional labeling of alcoholic beverages in the U.S. will go on for ages. Now we have the Europeans dictating what will go on the labels for beer, wine, liquor and liqueurs. However this shakes out, the Alcohol Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) has noted that they will give the drink industry 3 years for compliance and why Does My Butt Look Big In This Beer? Nutritional Values For Over 2,000 Worldwide Beers will be a “Must Have” book for your household or favorite bar.

 

Exporters and watchdogs question US booze labelling

Proposals for new mandatory labelling requirements on alcoholic beverages in the US have come under criticism this week from foreign manufacturers and watchdogs for offering no benefit to the consumer.

Both the UK-based the Wine and Spirit Trade Association (WTSA) and the US Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) claim that the current proposals to only label fat, protein and nutrients are a wasted opportunity for the industry and regulators alike.

 The labelling bill, which will remain under consultation until 27 January [2008], was announced by the US Treasury Department’s Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) in order to give consumers more awareness of what they are consuming.

 Research

In a statement released yesterday, the CSPI said it was unconvinced that the current proposals could serve the purpose, calling for “real-world” research for a new-uniform label that could encourage measured and moderated drinking in the US.

 George Hacker, the not-for-profit group’s alcohol policies director said that any labelling requirement would need to address the interests of the consumer and not those of liquor manufacturers or brewers.

“Consumers need information about calories, to help watch their weight; alcohol content, to help measure their drinking; and ingredients, to help comparison shop on the basis of quality and allergens,” he stated. “The TTB proposal also would not require disclosure of ingredients, nor would it require a statement communicating the government’s advice on moderate drinking.”

 Industry slant

 The CSPI said that it had therefore called for the TTB to go back to the drawing board over the proposals, which it claims have been designed primarily to please all manufacturers of alcoholic beverages.

 “There are brewers on the one hand, who would prefer not to disclose alcohol content on labels at all, and distillers on the other, who would look forward to portraying liquor as a virtual diet drink with zero carbs, zero fat, zero protein,” the group stated.

 While encouraged that the government had begun to take action on the labelling issue, Hacker said that health issues should be the main priority of any successful labelling bill.

 “It’s good news that the Bush Administration has begun a rule-making on alcohol labelling,” he stated. “It’s a shame that it’s proposed a confusing scheme that advances the public relations objectives of the industry more than it does the public’s health or the convenience of consumers.”

 Exporters view

 Though the watchdog criticized the proposals for having a pro-industry slant, some foreign alcohol manufacturers are also concerned over the labelling scheme.

 WTSA spokesperson John Corbet-Milward told BeverageDaily.com that there was concern from some European alcoholic producers that there was little point to the US adopting the labelling proposals, as they served no benefit to consumers.

 “Ideally, a single global labelling agreement would help ensure parity for all manufacturers,” Corbet-Milward said. “If there appears to be no benefits from the scheme though, then there is little point of introducing it in the first place.”

**********

In my opinion, the US Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) is only adding to the labeling delay with its over insistance on doing things their way, guised as wanting what’s best for the consumer.

 

 

Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, Beer Nutritional Info, Booze Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Liqueur Nutritional Info, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Spirits Nutritional Info, Wine And Carbohydrates, Wine Nutritional Info | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Nutritional Info For Avery Old Jubilation

Posted by Bob Skilnik on December 9, 2008

Old Jubilation    12 oz     21.90 carbs    242 calories  8% abv  Weight Watchers POINTS  4

 

Avery Brewing in Boulder, Colo.                                                    

Old Jubilation

Old Jubilation

Old Jubilation is reddish brown and rich, and at first it seems to be a simple dark beer that’s been flavored with toffee or perhaps pine. But there are no added spices, just a beautiful blend of five different specialty malts blended nicely with English hops.

Posted in Beer & Health, Beer And Calories, Beer And Carbohydrates, beer diet, Beer Nutritional Info, calories in beer, carbohydrates in beer, Malt Beverage Nutritional Info, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Sprecher Brewing Offers Treats For The Troops

Posted by Bob Skilnik on December 9, 2008

Treats for the Troops from Sprecher

Glendale, WI –

 

Do you know U.S. military personnel stationed in Iraq or Afghanistan who love Sprecher gourmet sodas? Thanks to a partnership between Sprecher Brewing Company and the George Washington Stein Club, you can now send your favorite troops a 12-pack shipper of Sprecher gourmet soda for only $25.00 through the Treats for the Troops program. That’s correct: You can send a 12-pack shipper of Sprecher gourmet soda to U.S. military personnel in Iraq and Afghanistan for only $25.00. What a great way to say “Happy Holidays,” or let these special people know that they’re in your thoughts.

To send Sprecher treats to your favorite troops, visit Sprecher’s gift shop and select the 12 sodas you’d like send or call the gift shop and place your order. Your gift may be tax-deductible; ask how when making your purchase.

On a related matter, scheduled Sprecher Brewery tours are free for all U.S. military personnel with valid ID. Contact the Gift Shop to make reservations.

The Sprecher Gift Shop is located at 701 W. Glendale Ave, Glendale, WI. Phone: 414.964.2739.

For more information about ordering

 

 contact Michelle Brzek,

414.964.2739 x114, or mbrzek@sprecherbrewery.com.

For more information about the George Washington Stein Club, contact Dave Bowen,

414.964.7837 x150, or dbowen@sprecherbrewery.com.

 

 

 

Treats for the Troops,

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Events Leading Up To National Prohibition

Posted by Bob Skilnik on December 6, 2008

 

 

Racking Room - Chicago's Columbus Brewery

Racking Room - Chicago's Columbus Brewery, 1915

Well, December 5 has come and gone, but the romanticizing of pre-Prohibition beer continues. I’ve included a chapter from Beer: A History of Brewing in Chicago that explains the national events leading up to January 16, 1920 and the state of beers during this time. As you’ll read, these beers were NOT the romanticized pre-Prohibition “craft” beers that some wax nostagically about.

Congressional Actions

     While the brewers and their allies in Chicago battled with the almost fanatical strength and determination of local prohibitionists, national and international events were occurring that would take the matter of prohibition to Washington and out of the hands of local officials.

     By the end of 1916, there were 23 dry states with prohibition laws on their books. With the well financed congressional lobbying efforts of the Anti-Saloon League and the U.S.A.’s declaration of war with Germany on April 6, 1917, the campaign for national prohibition became interwoven with President Woodrow Wilson’s institution of a wartime food control bill.

     In 1917, Wayne Wheeler and the Anti-Saloon League lobbied to attach a provision to Wilson’s food bill that would make it illegal to use any food material in the manufacture of alcoholic beverages, except for scientific, medicinal or sacramental purposes. Wet Senators promptly threatened to filibuster the bill. A compromise was eventually reached that took beer and wine out of the prohibition clause of the food control bill but gave the President the discretion to later limit or stop the manufacture of beer or wine as he saw fit. The compromise bill was passed on August 10, 1917. As mandated by a rider attached to the compromised food bill, the production of distilled alcohol ceased on September 8, although sales of the remaining stock of ardent spirits could legally continue.

     Most threatening to the nation’s brewers was a Senate resolution for a constitutional prohibition amendment that had passed weeks earlier on August 1. With the passage of the resolution, the necessary time for state legislators to ratify the constitutional amendment, which had been originally limited to five years, was compromised to six, avoiding a threatened wet filibuster but giving the League more time to marshal their forces. If ratified by Congress, the liquor industry would be given one year to close and dispose of its’ bonded stock. In exchange for this one year grace period, the House of Representatives pushed through the Webb Resolution on December 17, which further extended the time for ratification of the constitutional prohibition amendment to seven years, allowing considerable time for the Anti-Saloon League to influence the decisions of the legislative representatives of the remaining wet states.

     On December 11, 1917, Wilson exercised his authority to further reduce the amount of permissible food materials used for the manufacture of beer by thirty-percent and limited it’s legal alcoholic content to a paltry 2 3/4% by weight.

     On November 21, 1918, ten days after the Armistice, Congress passed a wartime prohibition bill as a rider to the Food Stimulation Act. This bill was to take effect the following year but the Federal Food Administration used it’s authority to order the cessation of brewing nine days after the wartime prohibition bill was passed. Preparing for the cessation of brewing in Chicago, local breweries began to produce all the beer they possibly could before the cutoff date of December 1, 1918. A scarcity of grains and the resultant closing of some plants in order to economize made the challenge of this new post-war measure difficult for the industry to respond to in such a short period of time.

     Beginning on December 1, Chicago brewers used the down time after the imposed brewing stoppage to continue to bottle, keg and sell whatever stock was still on hand. There was also a rotated layoff of the 7,500 employed by the local industry. In this manner, the local brewers hoped that they would be able to quickly recommence the brewing of beer if given the President’s approval. With the brewing moratorium in effect and no hope for a quick resumption of production, Chicago Brewers’ Association President William Legner estimated that the country’s dwindling supply of beer would run out by May 1, 1919.

The German Brewers And World War I

     The German and German-American brewers were not prepared to challenge the dictates of Washington after the declaration of war against Germany. Anti-German hysteria had already gripped Chicago, not only with the nodding approval of the local Anti-Saloon League, but also because of the questionable actions of some German-American organizations. When hostilities in Europe commenced in 1914, the United States Brewers’ Association began funneling money to the National German-American Alliance, headquartered in Chicago. But as the U.S. moved from a neutral to a more proactive stance, the USBA continued to maintain their fraternal ties with pro-German organizations. The Alliance used the funds, in part, to send out press releases that were pro-German in tone.

Author Bob Skilnik Discussing Beer On Fox

Author discussing beer on Fox News Channel

     As public opinion turned against “hyphenated Americans,”  including the highly visible German-American brewers, Mayor Thompson, at the time courting the favor of Chicago’s German-American voters, caused additional problems for the local German community. His refusal to support the early national Liberty Loan efforts or to assume the role of local draft chairman, infuriated many patriotic Chicagoans and earned him the name of “Kaiser Bill”.  In an effort to calm down some of the local anti-German bias and prove their loyalty to the U.S., Chicago brewers and members of affiliated trades and businesses later subscribed about $1,400,000 to the Fourth Liberty Loan campaign. Through the efforts of the Manufacturers’ and Dealers Association of Chicago, brewers distributed several hundred thousand copies of the Appeal by American Brewers to the American People, which attempted to repudiate charges that the brewers were pro-German. These efforts proved ineffectual as wartime Chicago developed a siege mentality.

     In late 1918, A. Mitchell Palmer, who held the federal position of Custodian of Alien Property, began an investigation of the Schoenhofen Brewery and its owners because of the family’s close ties to friends and relatives in Germany. The World War I Office of Alien Property Custodian had been created by an Executive Order on October 12, 1917. The Trading With The Enemy Act of October 6, 1917, had already authorized Palmer to assume control and dispose of enemy owned property in the United States. Instigated by the Anti-Saloon League’s Wayne Wheeler, federal agents seized the corporate and trust files of the brewery. Title to the brewery property was then placed in the control of the federal government in order to prevent the possible use of the company assets by enemy aliens against the United States. German owners of breweries throughout the U.S. suffered similar federal actions. Palmer eventually controlled $506 million of German owned trusts, including the Schoenhofen’s. Ironically, Graf Schenk von Stauffenberg, whose failed attempt to kill Hitler at his Wolf’s Lair in Eastern Prussia in 1944 would lead to his own death, was purported to have been a descendant of Peter Schoenhofen, founder of the Chicago brewery.

Ratification Of The Eighteenth Amendment

     After appeals to the beer drinking public and failed legislative efforts by the brewers to resume brewing, the fate of the drink industry was sealed on January 16, 1919, with the shockingly quick ratification of the Eighteenth Amendment  by the constitutionally required thirty-sixth state. One year later, the entire country would fall under National Prohibition. The Illinois Legislature had already followed suit with twenty-eight other dry states and ratified the National Prohibition Amendment,  the Senate on January 8, with a vote of 30 to 15, the House by a vote of 84 to 66 on January 14.

     But Springfield was not Chicago. Provisions of the wartime prohibition bill, passed in 1918, pushed the last date for the legal retail sale of beer and liquor further back to June 30, 1919. Brewers, distillers and saloonkeepers still held out hope that President Wilson would revoke the wartime prohibition bill and give them until January of 1920 to put their affairs in order, as agreed upon in the Eighteenth Amendment. The Armistice had been signed on November 11, 1918; as far as the brewers were concerned, the wartime prohibition bill was void. Prohibitionists countered that the war could not be considered over until demobilization of the European Expeditionary Forces was complete, a process that could last six months or more.

     In Chicago, Deputy City Collector George F. Lohman estimated that the abrupt loss in city revenue from brewery and saloon licensing and permit fees would exceed $8,000,000 per year should the saloons be forced to close. He also took note of the additional loss to real estate owners of useless saloon sites after the closings, speculating that the financial blow to them would be ten times greater than the loss to the city from liquor license fees. It was a loss that would heavily impact local brewers since they owned a significant portion of the Chicago saloons.

     A local Anti-Salooner official naively suggested that raising taxes to cover the $8,000,000 revenue deficit could easily be avoided by simply reducing expenses in all city departments. A Chicago Tribune  editorial, however, demanded a quick revision of taxes to make up the huge deficit. Acknowledging the cost of politics in Chicago and a need for municipal belt tightening, the paper also suggested a realistic percentage of the needed money be allocated for the waste of funds that flowed through Mayor Thompson’s executive departments.

1919 Referendum

      While brewers’ and distillers’ representatives continued to challenge the wartime prohibition bill and the National Prohibition Amendment in Washington, stocks of beer in Chicago were becoming scarce. By February of 1919, barrel prices had risen to $17, reflecting the dwindling supply.

     With prohibition fever sweeping the nation, Anti-Saloon and Chicago Dry Federation forces successfully managed to include the issue of making Chicago a possible dry territory on the April mayoral ticket, months before National Prohibition would take effect. It had been an uphill battle for dry forces to include such a symbolic issue for city-wide vote, culminating with a ruling by the Illinois Supreme Court that the question had to be included in the April, 1919 election. But the results of the referendum clearly demonstrated the present and future attitude of a majority of Chicagoans and their insistence on the right to drink. Wets won the issue by a majority of 247,228 votes, 266,529 men and 124,731 women voting against Chicago prohibition. Had there been a dry victory, local saloons would have been compelled to close their doors on May 1, in compliance with Illinois state law, fostered by local option.

Chicago Wet And Dry Vote By Wards For 1919

  Ward               Dry                    Wet                       Wet

                        Votes                 Votes                    Majority

   1                   1,024                  7,792                    6,768

   2                   3,188                12,826                    9,638

   3                   6,087                11,980                    5,893      

                           4                      873               13,907                    2,806

                           5                   2,203                  9,637                    7,434

                           6                   9,791               12,597                    2,806

                           7                 10,693               13,004                    2,311

                           8                   3,738                 8,329                     4,591

                           9                   4,836                 7,784                     2,948

                         10                     405                  7,104                     6,699

                         11                     857                  8,858                     8,001

                         12                  1,105                10,488                     9,383

                         13                10,472                13,730                     3,258

                         14                  3,043                10,448                     7,405

                         15                  2,486                11,221                     8,735

                         16                     509                  6,966                     6,457

                         17                     568                  4,490                     3,922

                         18                  2,949                  9,496                     6,547

                         19                     588                  5,247                     4,689

                         20                     624                  4,685                     4,061

                         21                  4,104                  9,784                     5,680

                         22                     728                  6,771                     6,043

                         23                  5,131                12,370                     7,239

                         24                  2,111                11,811                     9,700

                         25                12,563                16,576                     4,013

                         26                  6,826                16,288                     9,462

                         27                  8,714                19,865                   11,151

                         28                  3,531                10,651                    7,120

                         29                  3,026                13,350                  10,324

                         30                  2,094                  9,033                    6,939

                         31                  4,979                12,228                    7,249

                         32                10,145                15,160                    5,015

                         33                  9,578                17,011                    7,433

                         34                  2,280                17,141                  14,679

                         35                  6,943                18,622                  11,679

                                             _____                 _____                   _____

                        Totals        114,032               391,260                247,228[xi]

 

     “There will be no let up until fanaticism has been completely overthrown,” vowed William Fisher, secretary of the wet Trades Union Liberty League as he reviewed the overwhelming election results. “This is the message Chicago sends to Congress.”

     Congress, however, had its own agenda, something that brewers’ attorney Levy Mayer ruefully pointed out. Although the referendum had deflected the local option move to make Chicago a dry territory months before National Prohibition, its results could not stop its inevitability. Passage of the Eighteenth Amendment had been through legislative action, not by a popular mandate. “Members of the legislature and congress…have without a direct vote of the people, undertaken to amend the constitution and say to more than 100,000,000 people that they shall not drink malt, vinous or spirituous beverages of any kind, and that possession of such beverages makes their possessors felons.”  Mayer then threw down this challenge to the electorate. “ I can stand it if the rest of the American people can.”

     Buoyed by the results of the referendum vote and on the advice of legal counsel, Chicago brewers defiantly restarted the brewing of 2.75 % beer on May 1, following the lead of New York brewers. At this point, low alcohol small  beer was better than no beer.

     Hoping to influence President Wilson’s decision on extending the wartime prohibition bill’s effective date of July 1, 1919, the Chicago City Council adopted the following resolution and left no doubt as to its stance on National Prohibition;

     Whereas, In the present day of democracy the majority rules, and the city has by a vote of 300,000 at the last general election declared against a dry Chicago; and

     Whereas, If demobilization is not complete before July 1 the country will go dry by presidential decree, which will, when effective, mean a property damage in Chicago of about $15,000,000, a loss of business of $25,000,000 and inability of the administration to meet the pay-roll of the police and firemen; therefore

     Be it resolved by the City Council that we petition the United States Senate, Congress and President Wilson to declare the army of the United States demobilized by July 1, 1919.”

     Hopefully, if Wilson acceded to the City Council’s petition and to similar demands from other municipalities that feared that a reliable cash cow was prematurely drying up, it would give local governments six more months to draw additional revenues from the local breweries and their affiliated saloons and give them a little more time to get their financial houses in order. The absoluteness of National Prohibition would still be six months away, not scheduled to take effect until January 16, 1920, but time was running short. Wilson, however, let the wartime prohibition bill and the last date for the retail sale of alcoholic beverages come into law on July 1, 1919. He offered one ray of hope to the drink interests when he stated that when “demobilization is terminated, my power to act without congressional action will be exercised.”  With this ambiguous statement by Wilson of a possible short reprieve, there were predictions that saloons in states that were still wet might be back in operation by the end of August. Local brewer association president William G. Legner was wary, however, of unwarranted enthusiasm concerning the possible reopening of saloons.

Chicago Reacts To The Wartime Prohibition Bill

     In Chicago, attitudes towards the up coming closing date of city saloons proved defiant, not surprising after the results of the April election. Over the back bars of many of the saloons were signs declaring, “THIS SALOON WILL BE OPEN FOR BUSINESS AFTER JULY 1.”  Rumors abounded that some local brewers were so confident that the ban would be lifted before July 1, that they were not only brewing beer, despite the restrictions, but were once again brewing full strength brew.

     When informed that there were strong indications that some Chicago saloons would remain open after July 1, United States District Attorney Charles F. Clyne countered that he would be forced to prosecute any violators. It was pointedly noted that Police Chief Garrity had 5000 policemen at his disposal for enforcement of the closings. As the deadline date approached, however, Garrity was away in New York. Acting as chief in Garrity’s absence, First Deputy General Superintendent of Police, John M. Alcock startled everyone by declaring that “…after midnight it is a federal question (the enforcement of saloon closings),”  and indicated a reluctance to act.

     In the seedier areas around Chicago’s barrel houses,  the crowds of bums and hoboes grew unusually large as saloonkeepers tried to unload their stock. Huge schooners of beer dropped back to a nickel, shots of whisky from ten to twenty cents, depending on the quality. Authorities predicted a marked increase in the number of drunks who would probably apply for the cure at the healing Bridewell, Washingtonian and Keeley Institutes when the wartime prohibition law took effect.

     A last minute price war took place in saloons throughout the city as retailers dumped stock. “Only two days more to shop-do your shopping now!”  was a commonly-themed advertisement seen in many of the saloon windows as the deadline approached. A majority of dealers were staying open well past the 1 A.M. closing time, hoping to squeeze out the last bit of change from thirsty Chicagoans. Travelling salesmen, their satchels loaded with booze, scurried through the neighborhoods trying to entice potential customers of the necessity of buying their products now.

     For the would be home brewer, small cans of Hopfen und Malz Extrakt  were popping up for sale in delis and food stores. By adding water and a packet of yeast to the malted extract, the beer drinker was promised a stimulating malt beverage of at least 5% alcohol in five to seven days.

     First Ward Alderman Michael Kenna’s Workingmen’s Exchange mockingly announced a series of recitations and songs on June 30 to mark the passing of John Barleycorn, including “The Old Man’s Drunk Again”  and “Father, Dear Father, Come Home With Me Now.”  At the Hamilton Club, a dinner dance was to be held until midnight when the body of the late John Barleycorn would be brought in by pallbearers for a solemn, but tongue-in-cheek wake. Preparations in hotels, cafes and saloons throughout the city were being made, proprietors predicting record business. When some establishments still threatened to stay open after midnight, July 1, Alderman Anton J. Cermak of the United Societies warned that those who defied the law would endanger any chance of reopening if President Wilson finally declared the Army demobilized and allowed the bars to reopen.

Good Bye To Beer

 

     On June 30, 1919, Chicagoans celebrated like never before. Whisky and some of the more exotic mixed drinks seemed to be the drinks of choice. The reason for this was simple; Cermak declared that Chicago saloons had run out of real beer before June 30. “Two days before June 30, the last available barrel of real beer had gone from the breweries. There wasn’t a beer jag in town, unless some youngster had a make believe.”[xxii]  If Cermak was correct in his sobering assessment, it would have been the second time since the hot summer of 1854 that Chicago had run out of beer. The Green Mill Garden, the Marigold Room, the Sheridan Inn and the Rainbow enjoyed record business. On the South Side, the De Luxe, the Entertainers and the Elite, were reported to be open well past midnight. An estimate that over $1,500,000 had been spent on beer and booze caused one observer of Chicago’s greatest wassailing occasion to suggest that the city motto be changed from “I Will” to “I Swill.”

The Illinois Search And Seizure Act

     With a collective hangover of tens of thousands, the city slowly awoke the next day to learn that United States Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer had announced the night before that the manufacture and sale of beer with 2 3/4% alcohol could continue until the federal courts ruled on whether or not such beer was legally intoxicating. Recent test cases in New York had resulted in a decision to question what amount of alcohol in beer could be legally considered intoxicating. “We will proceed in an orderly fashion to establish whether intoxicating beverages proscribed by the law include those having less than 2 3/4% per cent alcohol,”  advised Palmer. Until the Supreme Court ruled on a legal definition of intoxicating or until January 16, 1920, 2 3/4% beer could continue to be sold in those states that did not have dry laws on their books. Impulsively acting on Palmer’s ruling, Illinois Attorney General Edward J. Brundage initially issued a statement that the sale of beer and wine with 2 3/4% alcohol could continue in Illinois until National Prohibition took effect on January 16, 1920. In accordance with these opinions, the Chicago City Council quickly passed an ordinance authorizing the issuance of temporary sixty-day liquor licenses, a move introduced by Alderman Cermak. The licenses now sold for $50 a month instead of the old cost of $83, which would have allowed the sale of hard alcohol.

     Later that day, City Corporation Counsel Samuel A. Ettelson conferred with Attorney General Brundage on Palmer’s ruling. As a result of their meeting, despite no federal court rulings on the definition of what amount of alcohol in beer was legally considered intoxicating, Police Chief Garrity was instructed to arrest anyone who attempted to sell any beverage that contained more than one-half of 1 % of alcohol. Brundage now ruled that “The search and seizure act of the state of Illinois, in force and effect after July 1, 1919, defines intoxicating liquor or liquids as including all distilled spirituous, vinous, fermented, or malt liquors which contain more than one-half of 1 percent by volume of alcohol, and all alcoholic liquids, compounds, and preparations, whether proprietary, patented, or not, which are portable and are capable of or suitable for being used as a beverage.”

     When reporters questioned Brundage on his reversed decision, he claimed that he had been earlier misinformed. “I was called on the telephone at my home and informed that the government had modified its provisions of the wartime prohibition act to permit sale of light beverages containing no more than 2 3/4 per cent of alcohol. I said that if this were true, it would be permissible under the Illinois law to sell such beverages here. When the full details of the federal government’s action were shown to me I immediately issued the new statement regarding the search and seizure law, which effectually prohibits the sale of anything containing more than one half of one percent of alcohol.”

     With the enforcement of state law versus a yet established federal opinion, the death knoll for beer in Chicago was sounded at 6:30 P.M. July 1, 1919.

     Some saloons and clubs openly defied the closing mandate. It was later reported that fanatical prohibitionist Reverend Arthur Burrage Farwell of the Chicago Law and Order League and his team of vigilant investigators had found violations of the 12 o’clock closing law on June 30. Farwell also disclosed that whiskey was seen purchased at the Dorchester at 67th and Dorchester and at the Tavern, located at 58th and State. The Reverend stayed long enough at these locations to additionally note in his report that women in all stages of undress were seen in both places.

Local Brewers Go On The Offensive

     After the closings, the Chicago Brewers’ Association passed a resolution to continue to challenge not only the wartime prohibition bill but to also challenge the National Prohibition Act by hastening any test cases through the courts. What they needed was a brewer willing to act as a “victim”  for a test case on the legality of manufacturing 2 3/4% beer. The procedural events leading up to a ruling had already been mapped out by the brewers and their attorneys. Industry leaders anticipated that an expected federal suit would charge a consenting brewer with a violation of the food conservation act and the selling of an intoxicating beverage. After arrest, the association’s plan called for the brewer to plead guilty and pay the fine.

     On July 14, a suit was filed by District Attorney Clyne against the Stenson Brewing Company. It was charged that the brewery “did use grains and cereals in the manufacture and production of beer for beverage purposes containing as much as one-half of one percent alcoholic content by both weight and volume…”  and sold the beer on July 2 to Timothy King, a saloonkeeper at 3153 Archer Avenue. Six counts were included in the suit, three for the sale of the beer and three concerning the manufacture of the beer. The Stenson brothers abruptly changed their original strategy of pleading guilty and instead argued that they were innocent of the charges, stating that the November 21, 1918 wartime prohibition bill “relates only to beer which is in fact intoxicating”  and that the information used in the charges “fails to allege that the beer made or sold was in fact intoxicating.”  They also argued that the wartime prohibition bill should be construed as unconstitutional and void since it was a wartime measure and that at the time of the manufacture and sale of their beer “No war affecting the United States was in progress.”

     Attorney Clyne confirmed that a dozen more suits would soon be filed against the North American Brewing Company, the Hoffman Brewing Company and the Primalt Products Company, the old Independent Brewing Association. The Stenson case was the first suit of it’s kind in the United States since a criminal statute was brought into question. Both Levy Mayer, special counsel of the Chicago Brewers’ Association, and Attorney Clyne worked together on bringing the test case to the District Court and eventually to the Supreme Court, hoping to force the federal court to arrive at a definitive ruling of what percentage of alcohol was to be considered intoxicating. A demurrer filed on July 21 by attorneys for the brewers once again argued that the wartime prohibition bill was void since it was passed as a war measure, the war now over, and that the law did not fix the alcoholic content which beer might contain.

     All arguments and legal challenges by brewery industry and legal representatives were ended with the passage of the Volstead Act on October 27, 1919. The Act clarified prohibition enforcement procedures and mandated a limit of 0.5 percent alcohol of any and all drink as the baseline standard for intoxicating beverages. In doing so, the Volstead Act quashed the final question of legality for National Prohibition.

Early Effects Of No Beer In Chicago

     Of the forty-three city breweries operating before July 1, only sixteen had renewed their brewing licenses. It had been expected that most of the remaining twenty-seven breweries would have applied for license extensions to produce 2 ¾% beer. But now, just days into the end of the drink trade in Chicago, saloonkeepers were serving near beer, pop or numerous other non-alcoholic drinks such as Old Crowe Flavor.  Of the 120 bars in the Loop, all but 16 remained open, waiting hopefully for President Wilson to declare the Army demobilized and allow a return to a whisky and real beer business. But as the saloonkeepers and brewers waited for a sign from Washington, the early effects of the state mandated search and seizure law began to cascade throughout the restaurant and hotel industry. Waiters at the downtown hotels and clubs started to bemoan their now sober customers. “I got a $1.50 in tips today,”  complained one frustrated waiter at Vogelsang’s Restaurant. “Before July 1, it was a poor day when I didn’t clean up $8 to $10 in tips.”  A Hotel Sherman waiter echoed his comrade’s sentiment. “The firewater sure did lubricate a man’s pocketbook. How’s a man gonna get tips on lemonade?”  he asked.

     Others realized the futility of it all; whether beer and booze came back briefly next week or next month, National Prohibition was just around the corner. At the famous De Jonghe’s, a soda fountain was soon installed. Workers at the Palmer House bar were following suit, converting the business into a soda fountain emporium.

     In less than a week after the state search and seizure law had taken effect in Chicago, saloon owners started to complain of poor business. One drink or two of near beer or some non-alcoholic concoction was the limit for regulars whom continued to visit their old drinking haunts simply out of habit. But the habit was starting to fade. John Dunne, a saloonkeeper near the Criminal Courts building, gave all his bartenders the day off for the Fourth of July. By noon, manning the bar by himself, he sold one bottle of soda on a day that business customarily boomed. At 12:10, Dunne had enough and closed for the day. Bartenders throughout the city complained that customers didn’t loiter like they did before. After the usual rush at lunch and after work, the once busy bars were quickly deserted as near beer and soda pop failed to satisfy the cravings of patrons for something more stimulating. Once thriving saloons lay deserted save for the empty beer kegs piled next to the bar. Wooden cases still holding bottles drained of their contents and now stacked for disposal beckoned their old customers through dirty saloon windows to enjoy “A Case Of Good Judgement”,  but to no avail.  

     Chicagoans had given the state imposed Search and Seizure Act less than one week before turning in their verdicts; prohibition, in a state or federal form, was not for them. There were those who quietly observed the reactions of thirsty Chicagoans with marked interest and heard their grumblings of “no whiskey”  and “near beer”  and watched the frustration and disappointment of desperate saloon owners as their livelihoods slowly collapsed. They realized that the prohibition of beer and strong drink would never satisfy the needs of a population accustomed to serious libations.

     One such observer was Johnny Torrio. 

Signed and personalized copies of Beer: A History of Brewing in Chicago are available through  Amazon. Click on the “New” link, next to the “Used” link. I have brand new copies availble for $9.90 as Christmas stocking-stuffers.

For a look at the evolution of American Beer, pick up this Christmas gift,
Beer & Food: An American History. 

Intro By Jim Koch, Founder Of The Boston Beer Company, Makers Of Samuel Adams Beers

Intro By Jim Koch, Founder Of The Boston Beer Company, Makers Of Samuel Adams Beers

 

                                                            

Posted in Beer History, Books & Beer | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

So Do We All Agree That December 5, 1933 Is The End Of National Prohibition?

Posted by Bob Skilnik on December 4, 2008

I’ve been bitching and moaning for the last few years about April 7, 1933 being celebrated by various groups as the end of Prohibition when the real end was December 5, 1933. On that date, the 18th Amendment was nullified by the passing of the 21st Amendment. In the meantime, I’ve heard all the contorted stories by a dwindling number of revisionists who still want to hang their hats on April 7.

Today is December 5, the 75th Anniversary of the end of Prohibition. Period. And as expected, beer writers and bloggers are wringing their hands about the significance of the date, its meaning in the grand scheme of things and whether it should be seen as a day of celebration or reflection. And with these postings, there seems to be a need to also tie the date to homebrewing and its supposed illegality during the dry years.

I contend, however, that homebrewing, per se, was NEVER illegal; what was illegal was the way in which malt extract (called “syrup” back then) was labeled and advertised. To support this argument, I’ve included a section from my last book, Beer & Food: An American History. What makes this book so interesting is that while it takes a look at the early marriage of American beer and food and how this union was cultivated, and gives a fascinating glimpse into why there might be a beer in your fridge today, it really details the history and development of beer in the Colonies and the eventual United States of America.

It’s this history that too many beer drinkers, writers, amateur historians and bloggers don’t understand, and as a result, the same old tired beer stories are told over and over. For instance;

1.) If I had a dime for every uninformed claim that corn and rice were dumped into beer coppers as a result of Prohibition (“They were brewing lighter beers for women,” “Brewers wanted more profit so they cheapened their beers”), I’d be writing this entry from the southern coast of France.

2.) Speaking of Prohibition, one of my “favorite” quotes and quite often pouring out of the mouths of some respected contemporary beer writers and “authorities,” is this, “National Prohibition forever changed the face of the U.S. brewing industry and the beers of old.” However, if you look at the neverending changes in the character, quality and brewing of American beer, you’d see that change was and is constant in the industry. In the short time of just a few decades, U.S. beer went from a creature with British origins but often brewed with indigenous American ingredients and brought to fermentation in a manner that some Belgian breweries still use today, to a murky German lager, in short time. . .cleaned up as a golden-colored Bohemian-styled pilsner, soon changed to a lighter version of the product from Pilsen with the addition of costly corn and rice, a product that eventually enjoyed shelf stability with pasteurization, benefited from the change from brewing as an art to brewing as a science and the resultant “cleaner” brew with the isolation of a single and pure cell of yeast, widespread bottling, the use of crown caps, a demand for ice-cold beer, the use of mechanical refrigeration, a wave of brewery closings and consolidations throughout the country when British investors bought into breweries throughout the U.S., only to find that intense competition had taken the bloom off the industry’s rose, increased beer taxes during the Spanish-American War, the brewing of a mandated weakened beer of 2.75% alcohol during WW I, the cessation of brewing in the United States on December 1, 1918, the later resumption of beer with an alcoholic strength of 3.2%, and finally. . .National Prohibition. So I find it hard to accept the argument that Prohibition irrevocably changed beer and brewing in the U.S. Folks, it was changing the moment the first colonist fired up his brew kettle, and it has continued to see change to this very day.

3.) Homebrewing was illegal during Prohibition. No, it wasn’t. Read on.

Posted in Beer History, Books & Beer, Food History, Malt Extract | Tagged: , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Homemade Root Beer

Posted by Bob Skilnik on December 3, 2008

 

Forget using yeast, bottling and then waiting 1-2 days for some carbonation to build up in bottles. Here’s a quick and easy way to enjoy homemade root beer almost instantly.

 

Makes 6 (1-cup) servings.                                                                 

McCormick extracts can be used for some great liqueur recipes too!

McCormick extracts can be used for some great liqueur recipes too!

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Refrigerate: 2 hours
******************************

INGREDIENTS

1 1/2 cups tap water

3/4 cup sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons McCormick® Root Beer Concentrate

1 bottle (1 liter) cold soda water, seltzer or club soda, carbonated water, or whatever you call it in your neck of the woods 

DIRECTIONS

1. Bring tap water to boil in medium saucepan. Add sugar; stir until dissolved. Add Root Beer Concentrate; stir until well mixed.

2. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Slowly pour cold soda water/seltzer or club soda/carbonated water/ into root beer mixture until well blended and serve.

Tips

 Root Beer Floats: Place scoops of ice cream in tall glasses. Slowly pour Easy Homemade Root Beer over ice cream and serve.

NUTRITION INFORMATION

per serving

Calories: 96

Fat: 0 g

Carbohydrates: 24 g

Cholesterol: 0 mg

Sodium: 48 mg

Fiber: 0 g

Protein: 0 g

Posted in Extract Recipes | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Benefits of Beer in Running For Runners

Posted by Bob Skilnik on November 26, 2008

Staying on the theme of beer and exercise, I ran across this posting. The website is aimed at marathon runners, but the consumption of beer by marathon runners is widely practiced. Anybody who can run 26 miles deserves a beer.

“Beer contains predominantly water and carbohydrate, both of which are essential in post-race recovery. A recent study at Granada University in Spain found that the sugars, salts and bubbles in a pint can help athletes absorb fluids more quickly than rehydrating with water.

“The carbon dioxide in beer helps quench thirst more quickly, while the carbohydrates replace some of the calories lost through exercise.”

MORE

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Know How To Drink Alcohol While Building Muscle and Losing Fat

Posted by Bob Skilnik on November 25, 2008

Gimme a beer!
Gimme a beer!

Article moved to

Posted in Beer & Food In The News, Beer And Carbohydrates, Beer Nutritional Info, Plugs | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Visit a Beer Spa

Posted by Bob Skilnik on November 23, 2008

“An original curative spa therapy connecting a soothing hot bath, the spring of healing mineral water IL-SANO, the unique dark Bathing Beer and rejuvenating effects of beer yeast with a mixture of hops and dehydrated curative herbs.”

The Real Beer Spa – the way to refresh the power of body and mind!

More Here

Posted in Beer & Health | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

WARM SPINACH SALAD with APPLES and BACON

Posted by Bob Skilnik on November 17, 2008

WARM SPINACH SALAD with APPLES and BACON

 

Serve with a Honey-Flavored Specialty Beer, such as Michelob Honey Lager.

 

1 small Granny Smith apple, cored and thinly sliced

1 small red onion, thinly sliced

½ cup dried cranberries, chopped                                                       

1 package (10 ounces) baby spinach

⅓ cup balsamic vinegar

1 tablespoon sugar

2 tablespoons cranberry juice

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons sour cream

2 bacon slices, drained, and crumbled

 

  1. In a large bowl, combine the apple, onion, cranberries, and spinach and toss to mix well.
  2. In a small saucepan, combine the vinegar, sugar, cranberry juice, mustard, salt, and pepper over medium heat.  Bring to a boil and cook for 1 minute.  Remove from the heat and stir in the sour cream.  Drizzle the warm dressing over the salad and toss well.  Sprinkle with the bacon.  Serve immediately.

 

Cook’s Tip: Toss the salad while the dressing is still hot to wilt the spinach leaves.

 

Makes 6 servings.

 

*Recipe courtesy of the Anheuser-Busch cookbook – Great Food Great Beer.

 

From the folks at Anheuser-Busch; Heres our recommended holiday spread (a new take on the traditional offerings) with recipes from Great Food Great Beer: The Anheuser-Busch Cookbook paired with our various specialty and craft-style brews.

 

Posted in Food That Demands To Be Paired With Beer | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Happy Halloween!

Posted by Bob Skilnik on October 31, 2008

Why can’t witches have babies?                                                              

Their husbands have crystal balls and Hollow-weenies!  

ALL THINGS HALLOWEEN HERE!!  

EVERYTHING HALLOWEEN HERE!!

 

Try the salmon and don't forget to tip your waiter!
Try the salmon and don’t forget to tip your waiter!!

                                                                                                                           

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